Best Sources of Iron for Dogs
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How Much Iron Does Your Dog Need? 5 Best Sources of Iron for Dogs

Give your dog treats like bones or chews that are high in iron. but you also don’t need to feed your dog iron-rich dog foods. Most commercial dog food doesn’t contain much iron. So feeding your dog kibble won’t add much to his diet.

It’s no secret that many dogs are not getting enough iron in their diets. If your pup isn’t eating enough red meat, or if their diet doesn’t contain enough plant-based sources, your dog may be lacking in iron.

Fortunately, there are plenty of options for adding iron to your dog’s diet. It’s just a matter of finding the best ones. Keep reading to learn about the best sources of iron for your dog’s diet.

Corn Dog Treats

Corn Dog Treats
Corn Dog Treats

Corn dog treats are stuffed with corn syrup and are a cheap source of sugar. The corn syrup provides a coating to the treatment that helps make it crunchy. Corn is a fairly low-fiber food and is not a good source of iron. Corn also contains gluten, a protein that can cause digestive issues in certain dogs. These treats are great because they taste good, but they’re not a good choice for dogs with food sensitivities. Try replacing corn with wheat gluten to see if your dog reacts well. Wheat gluten can be found at many supermarkets and health stores.

Lean Beef

Lean Beef
Lean Beef

Beef is a great source of iron, but lean cuts can be hard to find. The fat in beef naturally helps keep your dog’s body temperature stable and helps with digestion. Lean beef can be dangerous for dogs because it lacks fat and can cause your pup to have low blood sugar. Make sure you’re buying beef that has been designated as “lean.” Be careful not to feed your dog too much of this, though, as it’s not suitable food for long-term use. Beef is also not a good source of protein for dogs with food allergies.

Dry Dog Food

Dry Dog Food
Dry Dog Food

Dry dog foods are good sources of protein. Look for brands that only contain meat and no fillers or by-products. Look for brands that are grain-free and can be bought online or at pet stores that carry natural pet foods. The benefit of feeding your dog dry dog food is that it can be fed by the bag. Natural dog food contains a lot of vitamins and minerals that are essential for your dog’s good health. Unfortunately, not all dog food is healthy. Dry dog food can be a high-calorie diet, so your dog can become overweight if fed too much. Excess calories contribute to your dog’s potential for obesity.

Salmon

Salmon
Salmon

Salmon is a great source of Omega-3 essential fatty acids, which are essential for your dog’s well-being. Omega-3 fatty acids help with skin conditions, such as dry coat, and can reduce food allergies. Food allergies can be a serious problem for dogs and are difficult to treat. If your dog has a food allergy, you may need to do a trial of avoiding certain foods for a few weeks to determine which one(s) are causing their allergic reaction. Salmon is also rich in selenium, an antioxidant that is great for your dog’s immune system and helps prevent heart disease.

Egg yolk

Egg yolk
Egg yolk

Egg yolks are good sources of choline, a B-vitamin that supports healthy brain and nerve development in puppies and growing dogs. A lack of choline, which is found in low levels in dry dog foods, can cause your pup to have poor growth and a reduced appetite. Egg yolks are high in fat, which means they take a while for your dog to digest. This can be a problem if your dog suffers from digestive issues, or if they’re fed dry food. You may need to give them wet food that has an extremely high-fat content to help them digest their food. Egg yolks are also high in protein, which is essential for your dog’s growth, muscle development, and maintaining your pup’s weight.

Dark Green Leafy Veggies

Dark Green Leafy Veggies
Dark Green Leafy Veggies

Dark green leafy veggies are a great source of iron. This is a good list to keep in mind when adding iron to your dog’s diet. They are also low in calories and contain vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants that are essential for your dog’s good health. Spinach, swiss chard, kale, and other dark green leafy veggies are all great sources of iron. Turning to the list of best sources of iron for your dog’s diet, these greens are a great addition. They’re also easy to grow in your yard and are an inexpensive option for adding iron to your dog’s diet.

Fermented Foods

Fermented cabbage for Dog Foods
Fermented cabbage for Dog Foods

Fermented foods are a great way to add probiotics and healthy bacteria to your dog’s diet. These foods include sauerkraut, kimchi, and yogurt. Probiotics can help with digestion and are helpful for those with digestive issues. Fermented foods are also high in vitamin B-12, which is essential for your dog’s brain health and nerve function.

Final Words: Is Enough Iron in Your Dog’s Diet?

Yes and no. You can’t feed your dog too much iron, but you also don’t need to feed your dog iron-rich dog foods. Most commercial dog food doesn’t contain much iron. So feeding your dog kibble won’t add much to his diet. Feed your dog canned food with a high meat-to-water ratio. Or give him treats like bones or chews that are high in iron. Just make sure they don’t contain too much iron for your dog. If you’re not sure how much iron your dog gets from his diet, talk to your veterinarian. They can also recommend the best sources of iron for dogs.